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20120801
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CNN 2
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KPIX (CBS) 2
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Aug 5, 2012 6:00pm PDT
last second decisions on its own. with no help from the engineers at j.p.l. >> as far as the amount of control that the team has during entry, descent and landing, it's identical to the control that anybody watching at home has. we're all along for the ride. >> reporter: scientists can only watch as the last seven minutes of this ambitious mission determines the outcome says cbs news space analyst bill harwell. >> if it is a success it will be one of the great scientific triumphs of the space-age and if it fails i think it could be a setback for interplanetary exploration. >> reporter: the mission is to search for evidence that mars once could support life, an exploration that is expected to last two years. >> glor: what kind of tools and equipment does the rover have? >> well, it begins with the mask there that has a number of cameras on it to capture detailed panoramic images of regard mars as you have never seen before. other than that it is equipped to do what a human geologist would do on mars. pick up samples of rock and soil and then run them through an onboard laboratory to
MSNBC
Aug 7, 2012 2:30am PDT
to congratulate the team at the jet propulsion laboratory or jpl. you are steely eyed missile men and you deserve every missed high five of your celebration. it was nice to see that nasa saved money by hiring folks from the local best buy. and folks, just try to conceive of what was achieved this morning. we gently landed a one-ton, six-wheel suv millions of miles from earth. that on star lady is getting good. we now have two rovers on the surface of mars and three satellites orbiting it. basically, if the planets are a tray of donuts, we have now licked mars. it's ours. e we already had the moon. we just need venus for the month poply and we can start building hotels on them. >>> still ahead, your tweets, texts and e-mails. there are a lot of warning lights and sounds vying for your attention. so we invented a warning you can feel. introducing the all-new cadillac xts. available with a patented safety alert seat. when there's danger you might not see, you're warned by a pulse in the seat. it's technology you won't find in a mercedes e-class. the all-new cadillac xts has arrived, and it's bringin
CNN
Aug 10, 2012 4:00am PDT
, there is a bit of a peanut tradition. please explain. >> well, at jpl, you know, with a nearly 50-year record of unbelievable planetary exploration, about 40 years ago the tradition began of opening peanuts when a keen event in planetary exploration began. we passed the peanuts around for good luck right before opportunity landed. and of course some of the pebbles under the rover deck remind us of those peanuts so it's all a good thing. >> and also, mohawk guy. cnn talked to him just yesterday. let's roll the sound. >> the thought that in some way of kids and other people that are motivated to come work here because they see me and they say, that guy can put stuff on mars, maybe i can too, i would like to say it takes all types to make these missions work. >> have you been just overwhelmed by the excitement? and i'm not just talking about his mohawk, but the whole deep space exploration, really just this outpouring in the last couple of days i'm sure globally. what does that mean for you and nasa? >> well, it means so much for all of us, because this is an 11-year journey. the engineers at jp
CBS
Aug 4, 2012 5:00am PDT
think it's in the 9s. those engineers at jpl are really good. >> landing on mars has been a tricky thing. 70% of the missions that landed on mars have failed. that's both the u.s. and with russia as well. what are the factors that complicate this? >> the atmosphere of mars is thick enough to heat your spacecraft and melt it on the way in if you don't slow down in the right way. it's thin enough that it's hard to slow down. it's a delicate balance between slowing down fast enough and not slowing down at all. that's what takes this incredibly complicated heat shield parachute rocket sky crane maneuver. >> not to mention, this is something that scientists won't be seeing in real time. there's going to be a delay. why? >> well, it takes 14 minutes at this point for light to get from mars to earth. radio signals too. so this lander will be on the surface of mars in one piece or many for seven minutes before the signal gets back to earth to tell us that it's successful or not. >> we've had missions like this before. what makes this one different in. >> well, this one, it's the size of a smart
CNN
Aug 7, 2012 1:00pm PDT
at jpl from that to this. and rob manning, the chief engineer is joining me. rob, all the incredible pictures coming back that we've gotten. show us the ones we actually saw the mountain in the distance. >> that's right. this is taken by one of the two redundant cams. there's a lef and right haz cam. we have redundant set of those. but this camera right here took the first image of this beautiful mountain. almost as high as mt. mckinly. a fantastic place. >> reporter: if we come around this side of the rover, the images we saw as it was descending through the atmosphere. >> well, this camera right here, this is the decent imageer. it's hd quality movie camera that will allow us -- in fact has already allowed us to see a glimpse of what it looks like coming down in the last mile before you get to the surface of mars. >> reporter: less than a minute. tell us what we're getting next. >> okay. as of right now we've made a decision to raise this mass. this mass is currently in its stowed position. tonight our time it will be in the morning, later this morning on mars time, it will rise up
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)